See No Evil — 28/2/2017

See No Evil

It was time again for See No Evil last Tuesday. In case you have no clue what the heck See No Evil is, here is the shortest description I could come up with in four keywords: Talk. Motion. Shoreditch. Free.

Tom, Marcus and Sandra went to check out the eight year anniversary of the little event. Turns out that it wasn’t a little event though this time. The room was packed. And the speakers were brilliant. Here’s a quick summary of our key take aways:

Key take aways:

  • YUKAI DU — Challenge your style: Once you’ve developed your style — push it and figure out how far you can go while staying true to your style.
  • THE LINE — Celebrate your work: Be proud about what you do and celebrate it properly.
  • THE LINE — Go crazy and do it well: Let yourself get carried away in your projects. They put a lot of effort around presenting their work in the right way and they are incredibly strategic but also slightly crazy — in the good way. (You can read more about this below.)
  • THE LINE — Get out of your comfort zone: Try new and exciting things! One of their crazy ideas was to attach a GoPro to a remote control car and make film with two characters in that car. The result was amazing and can be seen here.

YUKAI DU

First up was Yukai Du. She talked about her career and how she tested the boundaries of her illustration style in every new project she worked on. Her style uses interesting colours and pretty patterns and is very pleasing to look at. Tom actually introduced me to her graduation animation film more than a year ago when I was still an intern at W12 Studios and when we had motion meetings in which we bombarded each other with inspiring animations. That’s the video:

THE LINE

Next up were two guys from the animation studio The Line. Their presentation was very entertaining. They didn’t take themselves and their work too serious which was refreshing. Their theme for the talk was: getting carried away. And that seems to be one of the things they are really really good at. Two examples:

Example I: Everything I Can See From Here

They made this film four years ago. Tom and I were especially fascinated about the way they incorporated the 3D animations of the alien in the 2D animation of the rest of the film. It’s done so seamlessly and beautifully.

Anyways. They published the film. Now most of you would probably say ‘Nice. Job done. On to the next one!’. BUT the guys from The Line got carried away. They had someone dress up as the alien character, they built the cube spaceship of the film and in the end they set up an event to screen and celebrate the short film.

Example II: Super Turbo Atomic Ninja Rabbit

The idea for this one came from one of the studio members. It was a comic he drew when he was a child and they decided to create an intro sequence for the imaginary comic. So they did (and they put a lot of effort in it):

Now of course that wasn’t all. They wanted to see if they could make people believe that this was actually a show in the 80s. Months before they had finished their intro sequence they started selling merch on a Japanese eBay account of one of their friends. They leaked all kinds of things online. Like this model sheet:

Then they published their intro sequence in a distorted VHS version on a YouTube channel:

And people actually believed it existed.

And again that wasn’t all. They organised an event again, had a bed sheet with a print made (how cool is that?!), created pins, had 3D figures made and they even partnered up with another studio to created a VR experience!

All in all the guys from The Line seemed delightfully crazy and very driven. They definitely put a lot of effort in their own projects during and outside of their regular work hours. And it pays off because another cool thing about their work is that they actually have people who make fan art about their films and characters! The worlds appreciates them and their amazing work. And I think I’m save to say that the audience loved them. And so did we.

– Sandra